The Importance Of Human Security

940 Words4 Pages
The advent of the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) in the US, has brought to the fore new dimensions to the global debates on human security with emphasis on addressing broader deficiencies such as disease, poverty, and environmental disasters. Such deficiencies are deemed are indispensable components of the human security approach. The shift in focus from state security to ‘human security’, has been viewed as the most significant attempt to widen the scope of security nexus and considered as the “sorely needed venue for highlighting the particular vulnerabilities of people who suffer violence from representatives of the state, as well as other forms of violence and injustices” (Stern & Öjendal, 2010:15). Human security…show more content…
Therefore, there is the need for a new and a more all-encompassing approach to dealing with the human (in)security nexus. On account of this critique, I would like to assess the viability of the biolopolitics and governmentality approach to human security in the wake of incessant global insecurity. Again, of concern to me are questions such as: Is human security achievable through biopolitics and governmentality in the wake of global terrorism? What are the implications of such approach to securing human security? Are there other necessary compliments? Should there be a new trend/approach to human…show more content…
It is therefore not surprising that Duffield sees human security approaches as covering a broad spectrum of social and developmental subjects which constitute an international security threat and concludes that ‘poverty, population displacement, HIV/AIDS [and Ebola], environmental breakdown and social exclusion, for example, all bear directly on human and hence global security’ (Duffield, 2006: 2). As admitted by Blair (2001), the complexity of issues of human security in the contemporary society makes international borders and the growing interconnectedness of livelihood systems and economic dependencies across homeland and borderland populations weak. The war on terrorism and in particular ISIL, Ebola scourge, migration turmoil call for coordinated global efforts to human security which go beyond bioploitics and governmentality approaches adopted by states in isolation. It also raises issues of the role of international institutions, especially NGOs and IGOs in securing humans
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