Humanist And Renaissance Humanism

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Humanists don't believe that individuals have souls, or that there is an afterlife in Heaven, Hell or Purgatory, or that there is a God who judges where people go in the afterlife. They only believe that is the only life we have and it ends forever when we die. In any case, Humanists are not discouraged by this lack of belief. Humanism is an approach to life based on reason and our regular humanity, perceiving that moral values are legitimately established on human instinct and experience alone. While atheism is only the absence of belief, humanism is an inspirational and positive state of mind in the world, focused on the human experience, contemplations and hopes. Christian humanism says that each human achievement and accomplishment ought…show more content…
Renaissance Humanism was generally considered to have begun around 1350 to 1400 in Florence, Italy. It then spread across Western Europe 14th to the 16th century. Renaissance humanism challenged the perspective of the Middle Ages. Even though humanists still supported their faith and believed in an afterlife, they felt as if their lives on Earth needed to be rich and satisfied; the individuals who could afford it surrounded themselves with delicate art and architecture. They loved sharing ideas and philosophies. Humanists started to see the potential outcomes of what they could accomplish throughout their everyday life. A critical piece of being a humanist was taking in the ancient languages: Greek, Latin, and Hebrew. During the 19th Century, a man named Petrarch was considered as the first Renaissance Humanist. Petrarch was an Italian scholar and poet in Renaissance Italy. He was known as the father of the Renaissance. The early humanists believed that intellectuals had a duty to an active civic life as many served as secretaries in the Italian city-states to princes and…show more content…
They are more interested in finding out increase the amount of good and minimize the harm they do, to each other and to the planet. Everything they do and think comes from them, not anyone else. When it comes to responding to life’s enduring questions, they are more focused on answering them without any reference to religion. Humanists spend their time finding their ‘real me’ as they ask’ Who am I?’. They want to find and unlock their meaning and their real self. They ask about the good and the bad. They want to make the world a better place. Humanists believe that their brain has the ability to questions and if they fail to do that and look for a high priest or elder to do their thinking for them, to instruct or to manipulate humanists, then they feel as if they are failing to live up to their full potential. Instead of finding comfort in answers to the great questions of life, humanists enjoy the unlimitedness of a quest and the freedom of discovery that this requires. They continually ask questions about things, however, they don't accept that there is anything that can be known with absolute certainty. Humanists attempt and work out for themselves the meaning and significance of life, what they have faith in and what they value. Humanists can't answer the 'ultimate questions' regarding why life started and whether it continues after death. They have no agreed answer to the 'ultimate questions' of what life
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