Samuel Morse's Invention Of Morse Code

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"Samuel Morse was an American artist and inventor best remembered for his invention of the single-wire telegraph system and the co-inventor of Morse code." Samuel Morse was Clergyman Morse and Elisabeth Morse's first child. His parents were strongly committed to Samuel's education and instilling in him the Calvinist faith. After a bad showing at Phillips Academy, his parents sent him to Yale College. Samuel’s record at Yale wasn’t much better than before, but he found interest in lectures on electricity and focused deeply on his art. After Samuel graduated from Yale, in 1810, Samuel Morse wanted to pursue a career as a painter, but his dad desired for him to have a more substantial profession, and arranged him to become an apprentice at a…show more content…
Samuel Morse adopted a more “romantic” painting style of large, sweeping canvases portraying heroic biographies and epic events in grand poses and brilliant colors. Samuel Morse returned to America in 1815 to then set up a studio in Boston. In 1818, he got married to Lucretia Walker, and during their brief union, they had three children. Samuel Morse soon discovered that his large paintings had attracted significant attention, but not many sales. Portraits, were most popular at this time, so he was then forced to become an itinerant artist, traveling from New England to the Carolinas to find commissions. As difficult as it was, he had painted some of his most notable work during this period. His work combined technical proficiency with a touch of Romance, resulting in notably dramatic portrayals. Between 1825 and 1835, grief, had transformed to opportunity for Samuel Morse. In 1825, after giving birth to their third child, Lucretia died. Morse had been away from home working on a painting when he heard his wife was ill, and by the time he arrived home, she was already buried. The next year, Morse’s father died, and his mother passed three years

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