New England Vs Chesapeake Colonies Essay

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The peregrination to living in the New World all started with the Protestant Reformation. In the 1530’s, Henry VIII wanted to split from the Catholic Church, since he wanted to divorce his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, because she did not bear him a son. That started Protestantism. In 1546, Martin Luther did not like how the Catholic Church was acting and he created and he created Lutheran. During the 1550’s, John Calvin also found Calvinism, which believed in predestination. However, all of the colonies were not the same, no matter what it was. Differences in the economy, politics, and religious beliefs caused the New England and Chesapeake colonies, that were both settled and ruled by the English, to evolve into two separate distinct colonies.…show more content…
Religion was the reason that some of these colonies got started, as many of them were safe places for them. Plymouth colony was created after the pilgrims, or also known as separatists, left England and headed to the Netherlands. They did not like it, so they traveled here and created the Mayflower compact. The Massachusetts Bay colony, which was created by puritans, did not like how Charles I and the church took care of things. This was the “Great Migration”. The Puritans, unlike the separatists, stuck with the Church. Rhode Island was created as a safe haven for all people; men, women, and children, created by Roger Williams which everyone thought he was crazy. The economy in the New England was way different than Chesapeake’s. Their soil was not as good as the Chesapeake’s, so they grew corn, pumpkins, rye, squash, and beans. They traded fish, whale products, copper, ships, timber products, furs, maple syrup, livestock products, horses, rum, and whiskey and beer. Politics were way different. New England, instead of a Royal government, they used charters for the governing. They all have to come to an agreement and abide by those

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