The Road Not Taken Poem Analysis

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Candace Flores English 102 Mrs. Teel 11 November 2016 Explication of “The Road Not Taken” The poem, “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost is about a man thinking about a decision he made. The decision he made in the poem does not suggest if it is positive or negative; the speaker takes note of that certain decision and the outcome of his decision had an immense effect on his. The poem is about decisions. The speaker wishes he could have been at two places at the same time, so he could have sooner or later in his life taken two streets as opposed to being only restricted to one. He looked ahead on one of the streets he could have taken, but he could not see as far as the other road can go and it turned and vanished in the bushes. In the second stanza he says he took the other street because of the greenery and was conceivably better since it was less of a voyage, and had very little more to offer than the other street. The third stanza says both…show more content…
Regardless of the possibility that readers did not realize that "road" was being utilized figuratively, they would in any case know the sonnet is about a man settling on a decision. Utilizing the possibility of streets is something we can identify with because we have most likely all come to two streets, truly, and have been doubts about which approach to turn. In some cases we have turned and found that it was the wrong way and that has taken a toll us time, made us late, or lead us some place we would not like to go. We can find somehow how even generally unimportant choices modify our lives, no less than a briefly. Frost keeps the tone and inclination light however it is about an intense subject. Despite the fact that it is unobtrusively reminiscent, regardless it makes a solid point. Understanding it can likewise make one ponder future choices and their potential outcomes. Perusing this poem resembled taking somewhat side street. It can have any kind of

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